Interiors/Upgrades

INTERIORS/UPGRADES

With other house plan sites, customers purchase a drawing set that details only the home’s exterior look and interior layout. The glaring omission from these drawings is any direction whatsoever in creating comfortable and stylish interior architecture.

Floor plan customers, unless they want to spend far more money on a local architect to complete the design, must then rely on their building contractor to make a vast array of aesthetic decisions. Or they can try their own hand at design, racing to acquire acquire technical knowledge about each building trade as decision deadlines loom.

This website solves that problem by offering, as an optional upgrade, a variety of suggested interior trim details from simple to elaborate. (See more detailed description in the section below.) And optional electrical plans ensure that rooms are well lit and that the home’s best features are accentuated.

The homebuilding process is an endless stream of decisions and these optional interior upgrades will guide you through that process, preventing costly delays and providing piece of mind that your new home’s interior styling will be in perfect harmony with the shingle style exterior.

With an interior package purchase, David Neff will become available to talk you through detailing decisions and can provide your local architect/designer with CAD files for easy design modifications.

(Other upgrades include stone/brick first-story exteriors. See below.)


shingle style plan interior details

Interior Package

By the time your walls are framed and siding, roofing, windows, and doors are all installed, the construction process is typically not even half over. Several months of interior finishing remain yet a typically house plan drawing set bows out at this point, leaving you to your own devices in figuring out your home’s interior detailing.

Original shingle style homes are best known for their weathered shingle exteriors but their interiors were equally striking. Just like their exteriors, shingle style interiors were classic, comfortable, open and informal, respectful of the past but never bound by it, and above all, quintessentially American.

As an optional upgrade, every house on this site can be purchased with a set of interior drawings that ensure your new home will have the same great style inside and out.

Interior packages includes:

-Complete interior elevations (views of every wall of every room)
-Interior moulding options, from simple to elaborate
-Fireplace design options
-Wall paneling options
-Stair detailing options
-Built in cabinet designs
-Kitchen cabinet layouts
-Fixture and finish suggestions at various price points

(Interior elevations are provided at 1/2” scale and interior details range from 1 1/2″ up to full-scale. Drawings are emailed in PDF and/or CAD format, as selected in base package.)


Electrical Plans

Electrical plans provide lighting, outlet, and switch locations as well as fixture types.

A good set of plans ensures outlet locations are both convenient and code-compliant. That light switches are located logically yet discreetly. And that a combination of lamps, wall sconces, ceiling fixtures, and recessed lights illuminate important tasks while creating an overall all environment that’s warm and homey rather than sterile.

Suggested recessed and surface mounted fixtures at various price points accompany each set of electrical plans

Customers will have an opportunity to walk through their new interior with the electrician and make adjustments to device locations but these plans will provide a great starting point for that conversation. Optional CAD plans will allow your local designer to make more extensive design modifications.

( Electrical plans are provided for the first and second floors at 1/4” scale and are emailed in PDF and/or CAD format, as selected in base package.)


shingle style house stone first story

Stone First Story

Below shingled upper walls and roofs, many early shingle style houses had heavy stone cladding on their first-story. Visually, this is a great way to anchor a house into a rugged or sloping site. John Calvin Stevens, for example, often employed this strategy in his designs for the Maine coast as did Bruce Price for several of his designs in Tuxedo Park, NY.

Foundations in these upgraded designs are typically provided with a concrete shelf that extends 6″ outside of the wood framed wall above. Additional shelf depths and layouts are available upon request.

(Alternate elevations & building sections are provided in PDF and/or CAD format, as selected in base package.)


shingle style brick first story

Brick First Story

Similar to the stone first story described above, a brick first story can give a shingled house a more substantial look. While stone is typically employed to fuse a house to a rugged site, brick is more commonly used to impart a home with an extra degree of refinement and formality. McKim, Mead, and White’s brick and shingle homes in Newport, RI provide a classic example.

Foundations in these upgraded designs are typically provided with a concrete shelf that extends 4″ outside of the wood framed wall above. Additional shelf depths and layouts are available upon request.

(Alternate elevations & building sections are provided in PDF and/or CAD format, as selected in base package.)